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WHILE SOME INDIVIDUALS MAY BE AT INCREASED RISK OF DEVELOPING MONKEYPOX, ANYONE CAN GET MONKEYPOX. 

About the MPX Vaccine

Vaccination helps to protect against MPX when given before or shortly after an exposure. Sacramento County Public Health (SCPH) receives limited doses of JYNNEOS vaccine, which is indicated for prevention of MPX. It is given as a two dose injection under the skin in the forearm at least four weeks apart.

Vaccine is being prioritized for individuals at highest risk for exposure to MPX at this time.

 

Who should get vaccinated? 
Vaccine providers can offer the vaccine to patients who may be at risk and persons who request vaccination. Emphasis is on vaccination of priority groups:
• Anyone living with HIV
• Any man or trans person who has sex with men or trans persons
• People who use or are eligible for HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP)
• Sex workers
• Sexual partners of the above groups
• People who have had direct skin-to-skin contact with one or more people AND who know others in their community who have had MPX infection
• People who have been diagnosed with a bacterial sexually transmitted disease (e.g., chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis) in the past 3 months
• People who anticipate experiencing the above risks

*The vaccine is not a treatment and should not be given to someone who is experiencing symptoms of MPX or has already tested positive for MPX.

What is Monkeypox? 
Monkeypox (MPX) is a rare illness caused by a virus that is related to the smallpox virus. While generally less severe and much less infectious than smallpox, MPX can be a serious illness. It causes fever, headache, muscle aches, backache, swollen lymph nodes, a general feeling of discomfort, exhaustion, and severe rash. The illness lasts 2-4 weeks. 

 

How does it spread? 
The virus is not easily spread between people, but it can spread through contact with bodily fluids as well as through large respiratory droplets that do not travel more than a few feet.

 

Why is it recommended? 
Vaccines can be used to help prevent symptoms when given before exposure for those that qualify and/or who may be at higher risk. 

What vaccine is used? 

JYNNEOS is a vaccine indicated for prevention of MPX disease. It is administered as two dose injection under the skin in the forearm at least four weeks apart. People who receive JYNNEOS are not considered vaccinated until 2 weeks after they receive the second dose of the vaccine.

Is the vaccine effective? 
Smallpox and monkeypox vaccines are effective at protecting people against MPX when given before exposure to MPX. Experts also believe that vaccination after a MPX exposure may help prevent the disease or make it less severe.

According to the US Food & Drug Administration, Jynneos is indicated for prevention of smallpox and monkeypox disease in adults. However, since no vaccine is 100 percent effective, it is important for individuals to reduce their risk of potential exposures to monkeypox both before and after being vaccinated. 

Will I have side effects? 
Most people who get the MPX vaccine have only minor reactions, like mild fever, tiredness, swollen glands, and redness and itching at the place where the vaccine is given. 

How will I get my second dose?

2nd DOSES Now Available: Due to increased availability of JYNNEOS vaccine, second doses are now available.  Individuals who received an initial dose of JYNNEOS can receive their second dose at least 28 days after their first dose.  Note that appointments are required as vaccine supply is limited. Don't forget to bring your vaccination record. 

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